Ciudadano Socrates

January 28, 2020

Ciudadano Socrates

Titulo del libro: Ciudadano Socrates

Autor: Jose Solana

Archivo: Ciudadano+Socrates.pdf

Ciudadano Socrates esta escrito por el autor JOSE SOLANA, Registrate ahora para tener acceso a miles de libros disponibles para su descarga gratuita. El libro esta disponible en PDF, epub, audiolibro y muchos mas formatos. El registro es gratuito.

SINOPSIS

Socrates has reached the age of sixty-five when the Peloponnesian War ends. The victorious Sparta imposes in Athens an oligarchic regime, known as the Thirty Tyrants, headed by Critias. The new regime, sponsored and assisted by a Spartan garrison, unleashes a terrible wave of repression and assassinations against supporters of democracy, who are forced into exile. Socrates continues with his quiet life in Athens. A few months later, the exiles, led by Thrasybulus, manage to reach Piraeus and defeat the tyrants, their chief leaders dying in battle. Democracy is restored and the opposing sides, democrats and oligarchs, seal a pact of reconciliation, which could be strengthened after more than a year of tension and uncertainty. After the terrible episode of the civil war, the leaders of restored democracy, like many other Athenian citizens, wondered whether Socrates" teachings had anything to do with the criminal behavior of some of his disciples, such as Critias or Alcibiades. With the intention of getting a message of rectification from the accused, in the spring of 399 BCE, Socrates was brought before a court, but the word that Athens expected to hear from his mouth was never uttered. Citizen Socrates puts the reader in front of questions that concern us and whose answers still are still shrouded in a halo of uncertainty. Were the teachings of Socrates completely alien to the crimes and betrayals of his disciples? If it is true that Socrates spent all his life dedicated to cultivating virtue, how did he fail to make his closest followers virtuous? Why was Socrates" moral discourse so high and sublime incapable of containing the perverse instincts of his disciples? Socrates has reached the age of sixty-five when the Peloponnesian War ends. The victorious Sparta imposes in Athens an oligarchic regime, known as the Thirty Tyrants, headed by Critias. The new regime, sponsored and assisted by Spartan Garrison, unleashes a terrible wave of repression and assassinations against supporters of democracy, who are forced into exile. Socrates continues with his quiet life in Athens. A few months later, the exiles, led by Thrasybulus, manage to reach Piraeus and defeat the tyrants, their chief leaders dying in battle. Democracy is restored and the opposing sides, democrats and oligarchs, sign a pact of reconciliation, which could be strengthened after more than a year of tension and uncertainty. After the terrible episode of the civil war, the leaders of restored democracy, like many other Athenian citizens, wondered whether Socrates" teachings had anything to do with the criminal behavior of some of his disciples, such as Critias or Alcibiades. With the intention of getting a message of rectification from the accused, in the spring of 399 BCE, Socrates was brought before a court, but the word that Athens expected to hear from his mouth was never uttered. Citizen Socrates puts the reader in front of questions that concern us and whose answers are still shrouded in a halo of uncertainty. Were the teachings of Socrates completely alien to the crimes and betrayals of his disciples? If it is true that Socrates spent all his life dedicated to cultivating virtue, how did he fail to make his closest followers virtuous? Why was Socrates" moral discourse so sublime and incapable of containing the perverse instincts of his disciples?