Como Tomaron El Poder Los Bolcheviques

December 14, 2019

Como Tomaron El Poder Los Bolcheviques

Titulo del libro: Como Tomaron El Poder Los Bolcheviques

Autor: John Reed

Archivo: Como+Tomaron+El+Poder+Los+Bolcheviques.pdf

Como Tomaron El Poder Los Bolcheviques esta escrito por el autor JOHN REED, Registrate ahora para tener acceso a miles de libros disponibles para su descarga gratuita. El libro esta disponible en PDF, epub, audiolibro y muchos mas formatos. El registro es gratuito.

SINOPSIS

A chronicled novel about the early days of the Russian Revolution of 1917In the "Preface" to the first Russian edition of ten days that shook the world. How the Bolsheviks came to power, communist educator Nadezhda Krúpskaya is surprised that this book was written by a foreigner, "an American who ignores the language of the country and its customs". It is true that John Reed was neither the first nor the only to demand a political, accurate, coherent answer to the fundamental theme of his time, that is to say, the advent of mass society. However, what distinguishes his articles and great journalistic chronicles is the strictly literary criterion that employs, or put another way, the determined will to style and the irrepressible desire for permanence. That is why John Reed still deserves the nickname of "chronicler of the revolution", and his memorable report novel Ten days that shook the world, the "chronicle of revolution on the march". Our edition has a prologue written especially by Manuel Neila. John Reed (Portland, 1887-Moscow, 1920) was a prominent American journalist and labor leader. He graduated from Harvard University in 1910, and began his journalism career for a socialist publication. Celebrated for his reports on the Mexican revolutions ... A chronicled novel about the early days of the Russian Revolution of 1917In the "Preface" to the first Russian edition of ten days that shook the world. How the Bolsheviks came to power, communist educator Nadezhda Krúpskaya is surprised that this book was written by a foreigner, "an American who ignores the language of the country and its customs". It is true that John Reed was neither the first nor the only to demand a political, accurate, coherent answer to the fundamental theme of his time, that is to say, the advent of mass society. However, what distinguishes his articles and great journalistic chronicles is the strictly literary criterion that employs, or put another way, the determined will to style and the irrepressible desire for permanence. That is why John Reed still deserves the nickname of "chronicler of the revolution", and his memorable report novel Ten days that shook the world, the "chronicle of revolution on the march". Our edition has a prologue written especially by Manuel Neila. John Reed (Portland, 1887-Moscow, 1920) was a prominent American journalist and labor leader. He graduated from Harvard University in 1910, and began his journalism career for a socialist publication. Celebrated for his reports on the Mexican revolutions ...